How to lose a trident in ten days

Last year, about this time I guess, I chronicled a nebari improvement technique that my friend, Ed, was trying with some trident maples. 

It involved taking seedlings and passing them through a CD and allowing them to grow. The full technique is explained in this post if you’re really interested. Here’s the tree from that post as we left it. 



As it is now 



I think I’m going to chop it here eventually. 



But today, in this lightening quick post, I wanted to show you this other tree from the same batch. 



Isn’t that a cool wound on the trunk? 

And the roots are wonderfully radial. 



It’s pretty much destroyed the disc. 



Like a hand clutching and crushing it in disgust. I wonder what’s on the disc….





“How to lose a guy in 10 days” 

Ah…..

No wonder, I’d be crushing it myself if the tree wasn’t already doing it. We need to extricate the disc before the tree begins to speak in a lazy southern accent and tries to sell me a Lincoln, not because it’s being paid to do it but because they’re just cool. 

I swear the roots on a trident are like iron. And with the disc removed, look at how cool and smooth the underside  is. 

That last bit of plastic ain’t coming out; hopefully it’s not the scene where they’re playing that ridiculous “Bullshit” card game. It could have been such a better scene but it turned into a cliché, much like many of Hollywoods efforts these days. 

You may notice that there aren’t many fine roots, just a couple coming off of each big root. As long as you have a few left, that root won’t die. A trident is pretty tough that way. Those big roots with very few fine hair roots is the result of how coarse the soil it was growing in. I’m putting it into some regular bonsai mix, it’ll promote finer growth, both on top and on bottom. 

Here’s the finished tree. 

Just kidding. That’s a big trident I got at a nursery that was going out of business after the death of its owner. It should be a good tree in time. 

Here’s our tree, recently emancipated from its chick flick bondage. 





I buried it deep to keep the roots from drying out in the unforgiving Florida sun. 

The next technique I’m going to try with my endless supply of little tridents is trunk fusing. 

There’s a technique I’ll be stealing from Suthin where you take two or three littler trees and tape them together to make one fat tree. Stay tuned for that. I’m so excited. 

The next post though (and I’m about to go outside to do the work) is a radical redesign on this elm. 

Time to get my hands dirty. Tee hee!

About adamaskwhy

Visual artist specializing in bonsai, mostly.
This entry was posted in rare finds, tips and tricks and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to How to lose a trident in ten days

  1. Walker, Jason S. says:

    Hey Adam:

    I live in Jacksonville and would love to come to your art studio/nursery. Can I?

    Hit me up by email or phone (904-571-1970).

    Jason Walker

    From: Adam’s Art and Bonsai Blog <comment-reply@wordpress.com>
    Reply-To: Adam’s Art and Bonsai Blog <comment+pfm5iiq36o5upoj-gqsdky8d@comment.wordpress.com>
    Date: Thursday, February 26, 2015 at 10:45 AM
    To: “Walker, Jason S.” <Jason.S.Walker@fscj.edu>
    Subject: [New post] How to lose a trident in ten days

    adamaskwhy posted: “Last year, about this time I guess, I chronicled a nebari improvement technique that my friend, Ed, was trying with some trident maples. It involved taking seedlings and passing them through a CD and allowing them to grow. The full technique is expla”

  2. Phil Krieg says:

    “emancipated from chick flick bondage”…now that’s why you are the “Wordmeister”…!

  3. Love the Tridents! Looking forward to the trident fusion technique!

  4. Elias Ortiz says:

    this is a very cool trick! Being so new to the bonsai hobby, I’ve found your blog to be one of the most informative and entertaining out there! keep up the great work and thanks for sharing your knowledge!
    -elias

  5. Reblogged this on Wolf's Birding and Bonsai Blog and commented:
    My favorite bonsai species.

  6. Vaughn Golden says:

    Cool technique, will def try it out. You briefly mentioned fusing some of those smaller trees into one. I know ficus it can be done with a lot of success. Have you tried it on elm?

    • adamaskwhy says:

      I have not tried it on an elm or even seen or heard of it. I wonder why? Maybe because they grow so fast? Look for the trident fusing on the next post

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